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Current version by: Nick ,

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If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can doway to correct it is replace the weird moduleexisting modules with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you needs. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can doway to correct it is replace the weird moduleexisting modules with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you needs. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

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open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need nowneeds. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need nowneeds. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help youyou find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help youyou find a matching set to replace it. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 (possibly DDR3; hard to tell from your photos) to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along wellwell and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along wellwell and it’s typically a pain to find a compatible enough match. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it. Since we don’t know what laptop you have, we can’t help you. It looks like DDR2 to me based on the place the notch is but I’m not entirely sure without a machine model.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Edit by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it.
 
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.
This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well. Keep the non matched modules but don’t reinstall them unless you find a exact match or a compatible module to pair it with.

Status:

open

Original post by: Nick ,

Text:

If you’re concerned about compatibility, the best thing you can do is replace the weird eBay module with a factory matched pair from a reputable vendor that meets what you need now. It’s not worth the effort to try and match up a module you’ll probably never find again since it probably came from a Chinese factory who sold them to the highest bidder willing to print a name on it.

This is also the easiest way to repair a RAM incompatibility as well, since it’s often hard to know why the mixed pair isn’t playing along well.

Status:

open